JapaneseFormation of sentences in Japanese

July 30 2021

Today, we will learn to create affirmative and negative sentences in a polite form using coherence. The Japanese sentence is as follows: subject + complement + judgment, i.e. remember that the verb is at the end of the sentence. In addition to verbs, we can meet the word で す (read. (desu), which is a...

Today, we will learn to create affirmative and negative sentences in a polite form using coherence. The Japanese sentence is as follows: subject + complement + judgment, i.e. remember that the verb is at the end of the sentence. In addition to verbs, we can meet the word で す (read. (desu), which is a consistency, added to adjectives and nouns. It’s a form…

Example:

1. わたしはがくせいです。(hiragan version)

2. 私は学生です。 (kanji version)

3. Watashi ha gakusei desu. (rōmaji version)

These sentences mean, “I’m a student,” where we have one: “watashi” (ja), “ha” (subject/subject, “gakusei” (pupil) and “desu” (be). Interestingly, not always such a sentence, we will translate as “I am xxx”, e.g.

1. わたしはラーメンです。(hiragan version)

2. 私はラーメンです。 (kanji version)

3. Watashi ha raamen desu. (rōmaji version)

The above sentences do not mean “I’m raamen” (a kind of Japanese soup), only “For me raamen” / “raamen please” and we say like this when we want to order something in a restaurant 🙂

As far as the negative statements are concerned, they look the same, only instead of the “pattern” we add at the end “me arimasen” (jap. じ ゃ あ り ま ん), e.g.

1. わたしはがくせいじゃありません。(hiragan version)

2. 私は学生じゃありません。 (kanji version)

3. Watashi ha gakusei ja arimasen. ( rōmaji version)

These sentences mean – “I am not a student”.

If you can already create sentences that are affirmative and negative, it is time to ask questions. The order of the sentence does not change, but at the end we need to add something so that we know that this is a question. Probably many people would like to put a question mark, but this is possible in the form of a simple Japanese language, which we will have later on. If we want to be polite, we must put a か (read ka) at the end. (ka) which indicates a question, e. g.

1. やまださんはがくせいですか。(hiragan version)

2. 山田さんは学生ですか。(kanji version)

3. Yamada san ha gakusei desu ka. (rōmaji version)

We translate these questions as “Is Mr. Yamada a student?”

Notice the end of the sentence, where after the か (read. (ka), an ordinary Japanese dot appears. Through this dot there are errors in translations because if we miss the か (read). (ka), we can translate the sentence as “Mr. Yamada is a student”. So be careful 🙂

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